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> The Rise of China, Hosted by Hu Jintao
Guest_Hu Jintao_*
post Aug 14 2011, 08:56 AM
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Welcome to this thread. What will occur over the next few years in China will profoundly impact the world's geopolitical landscape. Accordingly, it's only appropriate that proper space is allocated to the glorious People's Republic.

Will the restrictions on the political freedoms of Chinese people be gradually eased? Just recently, a peaceful protest of 50,000 was allowed to continue unabridged in expressing citizens' disapproval of the presence of a polluting chemical plant.

Will the Chinese economy be allowed the laissaiez-faire policies to develop and become a developed nation? Will the financial infrastructure of China develop to suit the needs of its people? Will China's central banking apparatus be able to cope with inflation, and continuing to peg its currency? Might China ever "catch" or surpass the United States?

Well, comrades, let's talk about some of these issues as they arise, and let's not shy away from the big picture. Might China's heightened rate of inflation, coupled with the lack of financial infrastructure to act to mitigate the effects of inflation, create social unrest in an increasingly connected and modern China? These will be interesting times, indeed.
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Guest_JackLosiStrader_*
post Aug 14 2011, 03:09 PM
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For all matters of the future, I consult the Ender's game franchise. I'm pretty sure China, Russia, India, and Pakistan will start up a brawl. And it'll probably be a lot less awesome than I am currently imagining.
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Guest_Hu Jintao_*
post Oct 31 2011, 09:37 PM
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This is truly a fascinating look into the magnitude of infrastructure China is now developing! Could any other country create projects of this scale? Could any other nation maintain 64,000,000 uninhabited apartments (you read that right) without crumbling from financial collapse or civil unrest? I think not!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPILhiTJv7E
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Guest_Research Monkey_*
post Nov 28 2011, 11:46 PM
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http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonchang/20...ue-its-economy/

I really just need to start a thread called "Why We're smurfed."
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Guest_Widget!_*
post Nov 29 2011, 02:03 AM
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QUOTE (Research Monkey @ Nov 28 2011, 04:46 PM) *
http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonchang/20...ue-its-economy/

I really just need to start a thread called "Why We're smurfed."


smurf, you're dark.
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Guest_Research Monkey_*
post Nov 29 2011, 12:20 PM
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QUOTE (Widget! @ Nov 28 2011, 07:03 PM) *
smurf, you're dark.


I don't mean to be dark, but I'm just really not confident in things.

We're basically at the point where the world economy is on the verge of plunging into a recession much deeper and more structurally disruptive than the one of 2008. and The only thing that can prevent it is European and Chinese policymakers making difficult, but rational choices. The EU needs to look at the sustainability of their integration as more than just a romantic notion, and the Chinese need to consider the sustainability of their entire economic model in its ability to handle exogenous fluctuations of it's trading partners, because without the kind of economic growth they have enjoyed recently, the entire legitimacy of the CCP comes into question.

The pan-Pacific trade talks, though? Good idea. That could easily be the global power nexus in a decade.
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Guest_Research Monkey_*
post Apr 19 2012, 02:15 PM
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http://www.economist.com/node/21553056

QUOTE
In 1980 China’s median (the age at which half the population is younger, half older) was 22. That is characteristic of a young developing country. It is now 34.5, more like a rich country and not very different from America’s, which is 37. But China is ageing at an unprecedented pace. Because fewer children are being born as larger generations of adults are getting older, its median age will rise to 49 by 2050, nearly nine years more than America at that point. Some cities will be older still. The Shanghai Population and Family Planning Committee says that more than a third of the city’s population will be over 60 by 2020.

This trend will have profound financial and social consequences. Most obviously, it means China will have a bulge of pensioners before it has developed the means of looking after them. Unlike the rest of the developed world, China will grow old before it gets rich.
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Guest_Crow_*
post Apr 20 2012, 06:12 PM
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Semi-topical: India has now developed an intercontinental missile capable of reaching Beijing. The press has dubbed it the "China Killer". They've also been rapidly modernizing their regular military forces.

The PRC is not amused.
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