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> French Art (18th and early 19th century), HURRAY POUR L'ART
Guest_katerific_*
post May 1 2009, 04:55 AM
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Jean-Antoine Watteau, Mezzetin, probably 1718–20
Jean Siméon Chardin, Soap Bubbles, c. 1734
Vincennes porcelain factory, Wine Cooler, 1753
Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Broken Eggs, 1756
François Boucher, Shepherd’s Idyll, 1768
Giovanni Paolo Panini, Modern Rome, 1757
Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates, 1787
Carle Vernet, The Triumph of Aemilius Paulus, 1789
Joseph-Antoine Romagnési, Minerva Protecting the Young King of Rome, 1811
Théodore Gericault, Evening: Landscape with an Aqueduct, 1818
Émile-Jean-Horace Vernet, The Start of the Race of the Riderless Horses, by 1820
Émile-Jean-Horace Vernet, Stormy Coast Scene After a Shipwreck
Eugène Delacroix, Royal Tiger, 1829
Théodore Chasseriau, Young Jewish Woman of Algeria, Seated, 1846
Pompeo Girolamo Batoni, Portrait of a Young Man, c. 1760–65
Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Mademoiselle Marie Gabrielle Capet (1761–1818) and Mademoiselle Carreaux de Rosemond (died 1788), 1785
Jean-Antoine Houdon, Bust of Voltaire, 1778
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Princesse de Broglie, 1851–53

Discuss.


My thoughts: we so called Death of Socrates.
That's a whole lotta Jeans.
was it mrrg or zzzptm who called Soap Bubbles?
I love me some Ingres.

This post has been edited by katerific: May 1 2009, 05:00 AM
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Guest_imatt_*
post May 1 2009, 11:16 AM
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Only one sculpture? Otherwise it looks pretty nice, very french, which was to be expected.
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zzzptm
post May 1 2009, 12:14 PM
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The Fisher King
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PRE-EMPTIVE ADMIN STRIKE

All silly discussion about studying a "wine cooler" should go to the silly discussions part of the forum.

That being said, yeah, lotta Jeans. Looks like we'll have to keep track of them with their last names. How about posting the images, then?


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"The world could perish if people only worked on things that were easy to handle." -- Vladimir Savchenko
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Guest_Vkbx_*
post May 1 2009, 12:53 PM
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Jean Antoine Watteau: Mezzetin
Jean Simeno Chardin: Soap Bubbles
Vincennes porcelain factory: Wine Cooler
Jean-Baptiste Greuze: Broken Eggs
Francois Boucher: Shepherd's Idyll
Giovanni Paolo Panini: Modern Rome
Jacques-Louis David: The Death of Socrates
Carle Vernet: The Triumph of Aemilius Paulus
Joseph-Antoine Romagnesi: Minerva Protecting the Young King of Rome
Theodore Gericault: Evening: Landscape With and Aqueduct
Horace Vernet: The Start of the Race of the Riderless Horses
Horace Vernet: Stormy Coast Scene after a Shipwreck
Eugene Delacroix: Royal Tiger
Theodore Chasseriau: Young Jewish Woman of Algeria, Seated
Pompeo Girolamo Batoni: Portrait of a Young Man
Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Mademoiselle Marie Gabrielle Capet (1761–1818) and Mademoiselle Carreaux de Rosemond (died 1788)
Jean-Antoine Houdon: Bust of Voltaire
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres: Princesse de Broglie





:]
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Guest_Jonesy_*
post May 1 2009, 04:53 PM
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QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 1 2009, 07:14 AM)
PRE-EMPTIVE ADMIN STRIKE

All silly discussion about studying a "wine cooler" should go to the silly discussions part of the forum.

That being said, yeah, lotta Jeans. Looks like we'll have to keep track of them with their last names. How about posting the images, then?
*

LOLWinecooler!

And boo for only have one statue, statues are teh win
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Guest_AK_WDB_*
post May 1 2009, 07:10 PM
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In AP Art History we learned Fragonard's The Swing as the epitome of Rococo. However, The Shepherd's Idyll also works well, as one of Rococo's main characteristics is the unrealistic portrayal of the lives of shepherds and farmers as a peaceful, happy fantasy. (See also Marie Antoinette's hameau on the grounds of Versailles, where she could go play and pretend to be a shepherdess while still being rich and having no responsibilities.)
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Guest_eric..._*
post May 1 2009, 07:21 PM
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the gericault is a retread. silly usad.
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Guest_mrrrg_*
post May 1 2009, 07:51 PM
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C+
at best for the art selected
an okay David (not great, just average)
No Fragonard???
a ho-hum Boucher
A Delacroix litho??????? Romanticism is all about color and dynamic action
Though I did call "The Soap Bubble" I was hoping for better

So many sub par artists instead......... sad.gif

Triple sigh for the artworks not mentioned
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zzzptm
post May 1 2009, 08:08 PM
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All in all, the art selections are easy on the eyes. I enjoy them. USAD never goes for the best of the best, so we always have to deal with a certain level of meh in the art and music curriculum.


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"The world could perish if people only worked on things that were easy to handle." -- Vladimir Savchenko
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Guest_mrrrg_*
post May 1 2009, 08:39 PM
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QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 1 2009, 09:08 PM)
All in all, the art selections are easy on the eyes. I enjoy them. USAD never goes for the best of the best, so we always have to deal with a certain level of meh in the art and music curriculum.
*

D''accord, mais....
do you remember the Renaissance art show....not a bad one in this lot

I wonder if they have to deal with copyright(??)

And as for music(quick scan only so far) Mozart as French composer???

C'est la vie....
I'm primed, I'm ready for next year....Bon chance !!!
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Guest_Ender Wiggin_*
post May 2 2009, 04:52 AM
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QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 1 2009, 03:08 PM) *
All in all, the art selections are easy on the eyes. I enjoy them. USAD never goes for the best of the best, so we always have to deal with a certain level of meh in the art and music curriculum.


Agreed.
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Guest_TheAwesomeKid_*
post May 2 2009, 04:57 AM
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Well, if they picked the best stuff, everyone would already know everything about it.

Granted, seeing one piece by Fragonard would have been awesome.
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Guest_The Roman Centurion_*
post May 2 2009, 08:36 AM
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Brings back memories of the Renaissance.
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Guest_spartandecathlon_*
post May 2 2009, 04:11 PM
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The one thing that surprised me was that there are no "strictly" FR paintings from David? I expected either the Tennis Court Oath, the Death of Marat, or one of his Napoleon paintings to be included. But I do have to say, the Death of Socrates is my favorite painting of all time, so it's good. Some of the others I don't like, othes I do - so . . . let the studying begin, well in 3 weeks.
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zzzptm
post May 2 2009, 09:11 PM
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Having read just a little bit on Fragonard, I'm sad to not see him here.

Death of Socrates has a lot more going on in it than Death of Marat, so maybe it was chosen for that purpose. You know how USAD likes to ask how many people are in the picture, or what's in some guy's left hand...

Really, though, I'd like to see more matters of interpretation on the exams. They wouldn't have to be subjective questions: the AP Art History test can deal with matters of interpretation just fine, and I'd like to see questions like that on the AP exams. Granted, they'd have to switch over to four answer choices from five to comply with good question-writing strategy, but I think it would be worth it in order to have questions more meaningful than "how many iron balustrades were on the second floor of the National Palace?" I was THERE, for Pete's sake, and didn't waste time counting balustrades, what with the amazing murals there to see.


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"The world could perish if people only worked on things that were easy to handle." -- Vladimir Savchenko
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Guest_mrrrg_*
post May 2 2009, 10:06 PM
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QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 2 2009, 10:11 PM) *
Having read just a little bit on Fragonard, I'm sad to not see him here.

Death of Socrates has a lot more going on in it than Death of Marat, so maybe it was chosen for that purpose. You know how USAD likes to ask how many people are in the picture, or what's in some guy's left hand...

Really, though, I'd like to see more matters of interpretation on the exams. They wouldn't have to be subjective questions: the AP Art History test can deal with matters of interpretation just fine, and I'd like to see questions like that on the AP exams. Granted, they'd have to switch over to four answer choices from five to comply with good question-writing strategy, but I think it would be worth it in order to have questions more meaningful than "how many iron balustrades were on the second floor of the National Palace?" I was THERE, for Pete's sake, and didn't waste time counting balustrades, what with the amazing murals there to see.

Totally agree with you...Amazing that there was no architecture.....Did someone not notice Versailles?? I know about the IRTs, but mon Dieu!!!!! And where are my voluptuous pastel madamoiselles???? How can you even think rococo without seeing real beauty in full figured women (apologies to Kate Moss wannabees)??? I promise to stop my griping about these second rate selections.....but except for the Impressionists, this was THE time of French greatness in terms of artistry...this was their age. It's like talking about rock music but not mentioning the Beatles or the Stones, but focusing on Morrison (sp) or Kansas

enough

BTW, where are all those great portraits of the Great Homme de France (ok Corsica)??????? Quelle insulte de monde!!!!!
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Guest_AK_WDB_*
post May 2 2009, 10:32 PM
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No architecture? You're right! Man, I'm surprised I failed to notice that. Architecture is hands-down my favorite type of artwork...that is a pity. sad.gif
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zzzptm
post May 2 2009, 11:10 PM
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In fact, there's no architecture OR photography OR textiles OR commonly-used items. Granted, this isn't a photo-rich era, but it's hard to do basics about photography without a photograph in the curriculum. Doing basics on architecture and the other things will also be a little harder this year.

Knowing about lighting in a picture, though... BIG DEAL. I'd also guess that knowing about the development of paint will play a role. Look at the white in the last painting and compare it to earlier works. That white is SO much more brilliant than in the others! Why? Thank chemistry...


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"The world could perish if people only worked on things that were easy to handle." -- Vladimir Savchenko
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Guest_AK_WDB_*
post May 2 2009, 11:19 PM
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The basics of photography are always in the curriculum under art fundamentals, even when we study periods long before photography was invented (think Renaissance, Ancient Civ.) As it is, photography was only invented around the end of the time period covered in this year's curriculum, so it's not surprising. They do have one sort-of utilitarian ceramic item (the wine cooler) but I agree that more would be nice; from what I saw at Versailles, there's plenty of potential.
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Guest_AD_B_*
post May 3 2009, 12:22 AM
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I am a little shocked they did not include the palace at Versailles. I mean... that's pretty basic stuff, USAD. The Hall of Mirrors is incroyable. How can that not be included?

Anyway, all the artworks are meh. They are all so... boring.
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