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Guest_AK_WDB_*
post May 4 2009, 06:47 PM
Post #21





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QUOTE (Jonesy @ May 4 2009, 08:27 AM) *
My plans for my future are so FUBAR it's not funny.

Welcome to the club.
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Guest_Captaink_*
post May 4 2009, 07:16 PM
Post #22





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QUOTE (The Evil Dr. Calculus @ May 4 2009, 12:25 PM) *
I hope to be an oceanographer or astronomer when I grow up.

I hope to have the resources to pursue a hobby of mine when I am your age, EDC...
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Guest_Jonesy_*
post May 4 2009, 07:22 PM
Post #23





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QUOTE (The Evil Dr. Calculus @ May 4 2009, 12:25 PM) *
I hope to be an oceanographer or astronomer when I grow up.

wait a minute......
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Guest_BadgerCam_*
post May 4 2009, 11:31 PM
Post #24





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QUOTE (Jonesy @ May 4 2009, 12:22 PM) *
QUOTE (The Evil Dr. Calculus @ May 4 2009, 12:25 PM) *
I hope to be an oceanographer or astronomer when I grow up.

wait a minute......

Ya. Why would you ever want to grow up?
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Guest_raconteur_*
post May 7 2009, 08:04 PM
Post #25





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QUOTE (rickshawman @ May 2 2009, 06:06 PM) *
QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 2 2009, 10:47 PM) *
lol Chloe...

After my senior year, I went to UT Austin, eventually majored in History, got certified to teach Math and History, taught Junior High Math then English and History, left teaching for seven years in the IT industry, including 2.5 years supporting Microsoft Exchange, went back to teaching at the high school I graduated from, and found myself in China a few years after that after meeting DDD.

Along the way, I got married (21 years and counting) and had four children. I never stopped learning and every time I had an interview or had to give a speech, my mind flashed back to Academic Decathlon...


.. Was it difficult to get certified to teach without getting a degree in education? D: I really don't want to major in Secondary Ed, because it means all but abandoning history classes my junior/senior year to take a bunch of ridiculous educational theory classes - e.g. "Computers in the K-12 Classroom" - but .. I don't know how difficult it would be to NOT major in education, then get certified, then teach.


Most states have alternate route certifications that involve some type of standardized test (here it's one of the PRAXIS--but don't remember the level) plus X years of experience. Here, you are hired as a "provisional" until you get the required years of experience, but you get paid just as any beginning teacher. Check out your state's dep. of ed.'s website. There should be info there.
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Guest_Dr. Roffles_*
post May 8 2009, 10:47 PM
Post #26





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I am entering my second (but, like SA, Junior) year at Duke University. I entered Duke pretty certain I wanted to major in Econ, but after a year I've decided to swap my original plan, so now instead of minoring in Stats I'm majoring in it, and instead of majoring in Econ I'm minoring in it. I could get a double degree and still graduate in three years, as is my current plan, but I think it would be an undue burden and there's no reason to overtax oneself when you can cover everything you need for less. My freshman year wasn't fantastic -- my GPA is about .3 lower than I was hoping for, I didn't get an internship or exogenous research opportunity this summer, and I don't know if I worked as hard as I could have in 1 or 2 classes. But it was a pretty solid year anyway -- my GPA is (even if lower than I wanted) still about B+ range, I've gotten involved in a variety of decent resume-building and enjoyable activities, I held a job, and I've built some very solid professor-student relationships. And I made a lot of friends. I'm on the right track to do OK, and I have faith that I'm smart enough to do well no matter what life brings me at this point.
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Guest_TheAwesomeKid_*
post May 9 2009, 09:54 PM
Post #27





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I'll be attending Princeton in the fall, planning to major in Either Chemical Engineering or Political Science/Political Theory. Lol, the two are so far removed from each other, but I am equally passionate about both. Regardless, I plan to concentrate in Pre-Med and go on to medical school, but I'm not planning too far ahead yet.
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Guest_ShannonNJ_*
post May 14 2009, 08:35 PM
Post #28





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Next year I'll be going to Bard College to be studying the unknown. Currently very much enjoying the free time now that decathlon is over.
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Guest_katerific_*
post May 14 2009, 08:56 PM
Post #29





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I'm an environmental studies major at USC and I'm looking forward to staying a student FOREVER YAY. Well, I'm really in to climate/ocean/environment stuff, and I really like research stuff, so going to grad school for some phd stuff seems like the best option for me. If I get to TA, that'd be great too, because a part of me would love to teach (the shy part of me wouldn't, but whatever). That's the plan so far, but I have enough time and enough background in other areas to switch if I wanted to.

The truth: most of the time, I like to just convince myself that I have control over where my life is going, but in reality, that's never really the case. Not that it's bad, but uncertainty can drive me bonkers sometimes.


edit;; AD bonus! it's the 2007 curriculum which got me interested in this stuff. /nerding
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Guest_Jonesy_*
post May 14 2009, 08:58 PM
Post #30





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I realize that I will probably never leave school. By the time I finish my degree in god-knows-what, I'll probably turn around and do research/be a prof at some college. I'm fairly comfortable with that outcome too.
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Guest_mrrrg_*
post May 15 2009, 01:55 AM
Post #31





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QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 3 2009, 12:39 AM) *
QUOTE (rickshawman @ May 2 2009, 06:06 PM) *
.. Was it difficult to get certified to teach without getting a degree in education? D: I really don't want to major in Secondary Ed, because it means all but abandoning history classes my junior/senior year to take a bunch of ridiculous educational theory classes - e.g. "Computers in the K-12 Classroom" - but .. I don't know how difficult it would be to NOT major in education, then get certified, then teach.


In Texas, certification on the secondary level comes with a set of courses that are separate from the Bachelor's degree.

And, yes, there are ridiculous theory classes, but there are also good ones. Depends mostly on the instructor. I had a great Reading class and a great Discipline class.


It all depends where you go to university. I majored in History, minored in English and got certified to teach secondary ed back when lifetime certificates were called provisional. That was back in the ancient days of the mid-eighties. In fact when I was doing my practicum at Irving High School, I remember researching the outlines for AcDec that year - something to do with Tchaikovsky if I remember. That was what got me going with AcDec. At my university you were strongly encouraged, not to major in Ed but in your discipline. Speaking now as a Dept head whose interviews prospects at job fairs, be careful with alternative programs. So many are fly-by-nights.
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Guest_spartandecathlon_*
post May 15 2009, 11:06 AM
Post #32





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QUOTE (mrrrg @ May 14 2009, 08:55 PM) *
QUOTE (zzzptm @ May 3 2009, 12:39 AM) *
QUOTE (rickshawman @ May 2 2009, 06:06 PM) *
.. Was it difficult to get certified to teach without getting a degree in education? D: I really don't want to major in Secondary Ed, because it means all but abandoning history classes my junior/senior year to take a bunch of ridiculous educational theory classes - e.g. "Computers in the K-12 Classroom" - but .. I don't know how difficult it would be to NOT major in education, then get certified, then teach.


In Texas, certification on the secondary level comes with a set of courses that are separate from the Bachelor's degree.

And, yes, there are ridiculous theory classes, but there are also good ones. Depends mostly on the instructor. I had a great Reading class and a great Discipline class.


It all depends where you go to university. I majored in History, minored in English and got certified to teach secondary ed back when lifetime certificates were called provisional. That was back in the ancient days of the mid-eighties. In fact when I was doing my practicum at Irving High School, I remember researching the outlines for AcDec that year - something to do with Tchaikovsky if I remember. That was what got me going with AcDec. At my university you were strongly encouraged, not to major in Ed but in your discipline. Speaking now as a Dept head whose interviews prospects at job fairs, be careful with alternative programs. So many are fly-by-nights.


But I would also add to this the warning of majoring in education and not having sufficient content knowledge. I can't even begin to tell you how many teachers know nothing about their subject outside of the textbook - and some don't even know that!

I think we need to do away with Education as a major. Require like 9 hours of classes, along with your majors of what you want to teach. That's good enough. Those education classes are a waste of time, you don't learn anything in those. I learned all my stuff by actually walking into a classroom.
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Guest_eric..._*
post May 15 2009, 02:21 PM
Post #33





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QUOTE (spartandecathlon @ May 15 2009, 06:06 AM) *
But I would also add to this the warning of majoring in education and not having sufficient content knowledge. I can't even begin to tell you how many teachers know nothing about their subject outside of the textbook - and some don't even know that!

I think we need to do away with Education as a major. Require like 9 hours of classes, along with your majors of what you want to teach. That's good enough. Those education classes are a waste of time, you don't learn anything in those. I learned all my stuff by actually walking into a classroom.


thats fine until you then have to figure out where you are going to find high school math, physics, chemistry and computer science teachers. even among those coming out with degrees in their intended fields of instruction, significant numbers did so through modified degree program options.

for example, the 'teacher certification' option for math majors at one school with which i am familiar requires the typical calculus sequence, the typical intro to linear algebra and differential equations classes, the discrete math and real analysis (into to proofs) sequence, 400-level classes in modern and linear algebra... and then three dumbed-down classes covering combinatorics, geometry and probability. in other words, these students are graduating with degrees in mathematics having taken exactly TWO 'advanced' undergraduate classes: modern and linear algebra. the other options require upwards of ten.

is this program sufficient for teaching high school math? probably, though i would hope that a high school calculus teacher would have taken the schools analysis sequence. is it an undergraduate mathematics degree? no way.

of course, it has to be that way as im not sure its in anyones best interest for flagship state u to be turning out fewer than ten certified math teachers every year.
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zzzptm
post May 15 2009, 02:23 PM
Post #34


The Fisher King
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Honestly, what Kate said struck a chord with me... we really don't have any clue what's about to happen to us...

When I graduated high school, I saw myself graduating from UT/Austin in four years with a degree in Chemical Engineering. What really happened? Let's take a look at all the major events NOT on my master plan comin' out of high school in 1986...

1987: I get married. Big one there. Did NOT see that coming.
1987: I also change my major to undecided.
1988: Change major to History.
1989: Graduate, get a job delivering pizza.

And there I was, in June of 1989, a National Merit Finalist Scholarship Recipient, highest Scholastic AD scorer in the state of Texas, a-schleppin' pizza for a living.

I decided that wasn't for me and chose to get my teaching certification.

1990: Move from Austin to Rockport, TX and take certification classes at CCSU, now Texas A&M-Corpus Christi.
1990: Get a job teaching middle school math in Aransas Pass, TX.
1991: Move to Dallas to get out of Aransas Pass. While applying for jobs, I find that Robin Hood has led nearly every district to institute a hiring freeze - only Dallas ISD is hiring. I consider a possible career with the CIA, but choose not to because of the high level of secrecy required. I then look into joining the Air Force as an officer.
1991: I get placed at the Arts Magnet High School in Dallas ISD. It's wonderful. I tell my AF recruiter that teaching's the job for me.
1991: Two weeks after that, DISD lays off over 300 teachers, including myself. I get my job back after suing the district, but it's a hard road, with DISD retaliating against me.
1995: DISD staff commit defamation per se against me and I resign from teaching. Did NOT see that coming, either.
1995: I get a job as a temp with Microsoft, supporting Windows 95. So begins my unanticipated career in information technology. I eventually get back to Microsoft as a full-time employee in 1999, just in time for the MSFT stock price to tumble - before I have a chance to exercise any stock options in my favor.
2001: My son Jarom is killed in a hit-and-run car accident. I think of him every day still. I also decide I need to get back to teaching.
2002: Richardson ISD hires me and I teach history at the school I graduated from, Berkner.
2003-04: I start coaching AcDec.
2005: I meet Dan Berdichevsky. This is a good thing, but, again, I did NOT see that coming.
2006: I find myself in China, courtesy of Mr. DDD.
2007: I'm touring the Southland on a Civil War trip.
2008: Mexico...
2009: Here I am at the end of a long chain of unexpectedness. I'm fortunate to have had my faith to comfort me through all the hard knocks I received and equally fortunate to have realized that success is something other than the size of a paycheck.


--------------------
"The world could perish if people only worked on things that were easy to handle." -- Vladimir Savchenko
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Guest_spartandecathlon_*
post May 15 2009, 05:12 PM
Post #35





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1. Pay teachers more - create competition in the market.
2. Require teachers to major in the areas they want to teach - at least at the secondary level.
3. Require them to take 9 hours in education if you want to get a teaching certificate (Educational Psychology and Philosophy, Curriculum Development and Class Management, and Educational Law).
4. Create a mentor program, where a new teacher is buddied up with an experienced teacher their first two years of teaching.


I don't understand how the math example above would resolve the issue. How is majoring in Education going to create better math teachers? That sounds like a problem for being a math major. I am a history teacher, taking more history classes is going to make me a better teacher. It's been my experience that so many high school teachers are not knowledgable about their subject area - especially academic teachers, outside the textbook. And it seems like most of those teachers were Education majors who took very few classes in their subject area.

I was a political science / philosophy major in college. Then got my MA in philosophy, then spent two years working on my Ph.D. in philosophy. Quit that, went back to school and took education classes to get my certification. I'm only speaking from my expereinces. My education classes were a complete waste of time, I learned nothing in those. My real learning did not come till I actually walked into a classroom for the first time.

This post has been edited by spartandecathlon: May 15 2009, 05:14 PM
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Guest_Kort Jackson_*
post Jun 1 2009, 01:41 PM
Post #36





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Well, as some of you know, I graduated from Holmes HS in June 2006, then went immediately to UTSA and became a History/Teaching major. To my absolute shock, I'm still on that tack.

However, I have joined organizations on campus such as SGA (Student Government Association), CAB (Campus Activities Board, which does programming on campus), VOICES (volunteering) and I am contemplating others. I entered only wanting a degree, but I've found that unless you get involved on campus, you run the risk of losing out of a far broader horizon.

Of course not everyone needs this type of experience, and I understand that fully. That's OK. But I feel that I am a far better student from such experiences thus far. I suppose it's all a matter of choice.

This post has been edited by Kort Jackson: Jun 1 2009, 01:42 PM
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Guest_Tsjr1704_*
post Jun 1 2009, 09:40 PM
Post #37





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Today was my last day of school at McDowell Senior High School, so I've been making preparations for college. I've been accepted to Edinboro University. I will be going in undecided, but I was thinking of getting a degree in political science and I also want to take some courses in labor studies. If that bores me and I get through college without any underage's, I was also looking into education. My parents are both teachers (mother is a college professor, my dad is a high school teacher that is now on disability), and I've inherited the outgoing and interpersonal parts of their personality that got them interested in teaching also. Most importantly, I'm concerned in building and solidifying links with my community and other mass organizations. I feel that getting a degree in political science will help me do so.

This post has been edited by Tsjr1704: Jun 1 2009, 09:41 PM
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