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> Your Summer Reading List, what are you going to read this summer?
Research Monkey
post Apr 30 2013, 06:37 AM
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Can you tell how stoked I am for school to be done? I'm pretty stoked. What am I going to do with my free time? Read books like a madman. What are you going to read over the summer?

We might even wanna turn this into a broader new books thread, but we'll see about that later. For the summer...

I need to finish:

Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
This Side of Paradise - Fitzgerald
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
Crime and Punishment - Dostoevsky
Fathers and Sons - Ivan Turgenev

and then I will start:

Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
The Joy Luck Club - Amy Tan
Candide - Voltaire
The Book of Laughter and Forgetting - Milan Kundera
Discipline and Punish - Focault
The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison
Cry, The Beloved Country - Alan Patton
South of the Border, West of the Sun - Murakami
Sputnik Sweetheart - Murakami
The Name of the Rose - Eco
Gravity's Rainbow - Pynchon
Portnoy's Complaint - Roth
Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
The Garden Party - Vaclav Havel

then, I may possibly a reread of my favorite books ever:

The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Kundera
All Quiet on the Western Front - EM Remarque
The Trial - Kafka
Snow Country - Kawabata

What are you reading over the summer? Or right now?

This post has been edited by Research Monkey: Apr 30 2013, 01:02 PM


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Crow
post Apr 30 2013, 08:10 AM
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I've got quite a backlog I want to chew into. By genre:

Hard boiled

Picked up a Dashiell Hammet omnibus, so...
The Maltese Falcon
The Thin Man
The Glass Key
The Dain Curse
Red Harvest

Horror

Offspring- Jack Ketchum
Heart-Shaped Box -Joe Hill
Mutated- Joe McKinney
The Howling- Gary Bradner
The Orchard- Charles Grant
Clickers- JF Gonzalez & Mark Williams
A Richard Matheson anthology
A Joe R. Lansdale anthology
A small stack of multi-author anthologies

Sci-Fi

More David Drake than you can shake a stick at

Thriller

The Third Gate- Lincoln Child
Running Blind- Lee Child
Ghosts of Manhattan- George Mann


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Widget!
post Apr 30 2013, 05:11 PM
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I've got like three books left in the Foundation series, so that's on there, and I want to finish Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series; I read the first and it is clearly Mass Effect, so now I have to read the others.

Ada, or Ardor Nabokov
The Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky
Dubliners Joyce

So uh...does anyone have any suggestions?


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QUOTE (Research Monkey @ Sep 19 2011, 08:59 AM) *
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AK_WDB
post May 1 2013, 12:06 AM
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the_crazy_honors
post May 1 2013, 12:41 AM
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QUOTE (AK_WDB @ Apr 30 2013, 07:06 PM) *
Reading list:
- Lots of articles on the Internet

Writing list:
- Diary entries about how Research Monkey makes me cry because of my literary inferiority

This. I'll be reading The Sun Also Rises and writing a complete set of outlines (you guys are going to give me hell until I actually do it).
In any free time, I'd like to read Brave New World. I also want to check out some O'Brien, Fitzgerald, and more Hemingway; I've read all three of them this year and loved certain aspects of their writing.


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Crow
post May 1 2013, 02:41 AM
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Anybody with e-reader capabilities might want to check this out. It's free, and it features a story about vampire plastic bags.

Vampire. Plastic. Bags. Tell me you are not intrigued.

No, really. That's what the story is about, and it's pretty good. And free.


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Jonesy
post May 1 2013, 07:11 AM
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screw gravity's rainbow


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wutherering
post May 1 2013, 11:03 PM
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QUOTE (the_crazy_honors @ Apr 30 2013, 05:41 PM) *
This. I'll be reading The Sun Also Rises and writing a complete set of outlines (you guys are going to give me hell until I actually do it).
In any free time, I'd like to read Brave New World. I also want to check out some O'Brien, Fitzgerald, and more Hemingway; I've read all three of them this year and loved certain aspects of their writing.

For some reason the scholastic reading catalog for when I was in fifth grade had Brave New World in it. A fact that shocked me when I read ten pages in. For Fitzgerald I would try checking out his short stories- they are really amusing and have great twists at the end.

A mention of Infinite Jest reminds me that I should read The Pale King, and probably Infinite Jest too. It seems like every time I read Infinite Jest again it gets better and my understanding of it gets better.
I probably should reread the second half of the Ender's Game series, and some other Orson Scott Card.
I have been meaning to get more than halfway through The Plague by Camous.
Heinlein, probably the Moon is a Harsh Mistress and other books.
Lord Jim and Nostromo by Conrad.
And, uh, other stuff? I want to get into fantasy, but I have a hard time finding actually good fantasy- I have asked my school librarian for suggestions, which were underwhelming, and picked out random books from the library, which were cringe-inducing.

Also, hi, i'm Heidi, previous V2 from Beverly Hills.



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Widget!
post May 1 2013, 11:48 PM
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QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 04:03 PM) *
Heinlein, probably the Moon is a Harsh Mistress and other books.


Nothing that Heinlein has written is as hard to read as Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Robert, we don't actually speak Russian, and you didn't write this novel in that language anyway. We need pronouns.

Good book though. Read Stranger in a Strange Land if you get the chance.


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QUOTE (overly_critical_man @ Sep 19 2011, 11:04 AM) *
QUOTE (Research Monkey @ Sep 19 2011, 08:59 AM) *
Also, why are there serious posts in here when we could be talking about ass and bacon?


I often lie awake in bed at night, wondering this to myself.
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wutherering
post May 2 2013, 12:07 AM
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QUOTE (Widget! @ May 1 2013, 04:48 PM) *
QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 04:03 PM) *
Heinlein, probably the Moon is a Harsh Mistress and other books.


Nothing that Heinlein has written is as hard to read as Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Robert, we don't actually speak Russian, and you didn't write this novel in that language anyway. We need pronouns.

Good book though. Read Stranger in a Strange Land if you get the chance.

I have actually gotten about halfway through it (I have a really horrible habit of getting 1/2 to 3/4ths of a way through a book and then abandoning it), and the no pronouns and Russian vernacular mixed through didn't bother me that much. Maybe because I have a teammate who knows Russian and hates pronouns? I did find it hard, mostly because of the philosophy that the professor was spouting. Nothing turns me off a book more than long passages about philosophy. Although, ashamedly, I did get through (and loved) the Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged, and Anthem (when I was thirteen or fourteen). I have read Stranger in a Strange Land, and was shocked to find out that the two were written by the same person. Although I am not sure if I grokked it the best I could, and that was three or four years ago.
Also, If you have any suggestions for good sci-fi, I would really appreciate any!


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wutherering
post May 2 2013, 12:13 AM
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Now that I think about it, I am not sure if grokked can be used like that. I guess I don't grok how to use the work grok tongue.gif.


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Widget!
post May 2 2013, 01:23 AM
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QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 05:07 PM) *
I did find it hard, mostly because of the philosophy that the professor was spouting. Nothing turns me off a book more than long passages about philosophy.


And here, I love when books do that. Well, depending on the point of doing that. There's quoting philosophy because, "Oh look how learned I am," and then there's talking about philosophy because, "I have something to get at here." Ultimately though, I just have a deep appreciation for philosophy, and feel like everyone else should.

Give Sophie's World a try; I haven't finished it yet, and admittedly it is already getting weird, but I feel like it does a good job of talking about philosophy for extended periods while having a cohesive purpose for doing so, and the fact that it's a survey of the philosophical canon instead of being a polemic about the author's beliefs--which Heinlein actually does a lot--helps.

Plus, part of the problem with Heinlein talking about philosophy is that Heinlein was a very political thinker, who happened to be wrong about most of the political things he thought. His author mouthpiece in Stranger in a Strange Land, Jubal Harshaw, is by far the only tolerable one, as Jubal mostly talks about ethics/religion and living well.

QUOTE
Also, If you have any suggestions for good sci-fi, I would really appreciate any!


Foundation foundation foundation foundation foundation

My sci-fi cred isn't actually bulked out like it should be. I haven't even gotten around to Hitchhiker's Guide--and I will wait another year for every complaint about that fact. What have you read already? I can make some recommendations from that.


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QUOTE (overly_critical_man @ Sep 19 2011, 11:04 AM) *
QUOTE (Research Monkey @ Sep 19 2011, 08:59 AM) *
Also, why are there serious posts in here when we could be talking about ass and bacon?


I often lie awake in bed at night, wondering this to myself.
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the_crazy_honors
post May 2 2013, 01:31 AM
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QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 06:03 PM) *
Also, hi, i'm Heidi, previous V2 from Beverly Hills.

Hello! If you don't mind, hop over here. I love getting new members and want everyone to have the opportunity to know who's talking to them.


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wutherering
post May 2 2013, 02:27 AM
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QUOTE (Widget! @ May 1 2013, 06:23 PM) *
QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 05:07 PM) *
I did find it hard, mostly because of the philosophy that the professor was spouting. Nothing turns me off a book more than long passages about philosophy.


And here, I love when books do that. Well, depending on the point of doing that. There's quoting philosophy because, "Oh look how learned I am," and then there's talking about philosophy because, "I have something to get at here." Ultimately though, I just have a deep appreciation for philosophy, and feel like everyone else should.

Give Sophie's World a try; I haven't finished it yet, and admittedly it is already getting weird, but I feel like it does a good job of talking about philosophy for extended periods while having a cohesive purpose for doing so, and the fact that it's a survey of the philosophical canon instead of being a polemic about the author's beliefs--which Heinlein actually does a lot--helps.

Plus, part of the problem with Heinlein talking about philosophy is that Heinlein was a very political thinker, who happened to be wrong about most of the political things he thought. His author mouthpiece in Stranger in a Strange Land, Jubal Harshaw, is by far the only tolerable one, as Jubal mostly talks about ethics/religion and living well.

QUOTE
Also, If you have any suggestions for good sci-fi, I would really appreciate any!


Foundation foundation foundation foundation foundation

My sci-fi cred isn't actually bulked out like it should be. I haven't even gotten around to Hitchhiker's Guide--and I will wait another year for every complaint about that fact. What have you read already? I can make some recommendations from that.

In regards to sci-fi, my experience in the genre is limited to the extensive Star Wars continuing series and Warhammer40k books. So my tastes generally tend to the bloody? I have read the Hitchiker's Guide, but I am looking for something a bit more serious than that to get into- a little bit harder and preferably a series?
In the philosophy department, I tend to the nihilist- just don't see the point?


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Research Monkey
post May 2 2013, 03:06 AM
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QUOTE (AK_WDB @ Apr 30 2013, 05:06 PM) *
Writing list:
- Diary entries about how Research Monkey makes me cry because of my literary inferiority


laugh.gif

QUOTE (the_crazy_honors @ Apr 30 2013, 05:41 PM) *
This. I'll be reading The Sun Also Rises and writing a complete set of outlines (you guys are going to give me hell until I actually do it).
In any free time, I'd like to read Brave New World. I also want to check out some O'Brien, Fitzgerald, and more Hemingway; I've read all three of them this year and loved certain aspects of their writing.


Kinda pissed that the reading for next year wasn't All Quiet on the Western Front. Let's be honest, this isn't just about my indifference towards American authors that aren't Fitzgerald or Faulkner. The Sun Also Rises is less about World War I and just not the same caliber of novel IMO.

QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 05:07 PM) *
1. I did get through (and loved) the Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged, and Anthem

2. (when I was thirteen or fourteen)


I'd argue one of these clauses explains the other.

QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 05:07 PM) *
Nothing turns me off a book more than long passages about philosophy.


You make me sad...

This post has been edited by Research Monkey: May 2 2013, 03:19 AM


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the_crazy_honors
post May 2 2013, 03:29 AM
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QUOTE (Research Monkey @ May 1 2013, 10:06 PM) *
QUOTE (the_crazy_honors @ Apr 30 2013, 05:41 PM) *
This. I'll be reading The Sun Also Rises and writing a complete set of outlines (you guys are going to give me hell until I actually do it).
In any free time, I'd like to read Brave New World. I also want to check out some O'Brien, Fitzgerald, and more Hemingway; I've read all three of them this year and loved certain aspects of their writing.


Kinda pissed that the reading for next year wasn't All Quiet on the Western Front. Let's be honest, this isn't just about my indifference towards American authors that aren't Fitzgerald or Faulkner. The Sun Also Rises is less about World War I and just not the same caliber of novel IMO.

I agree that they should have gone with a different novel. I'm not familiar with All Quiet, but A Farewell to Arms was beautiful and handled the direct effects of the war, during the war itself. Gatsby will become one of my favorite books of all time once I get my own copy and reread it; even reading a school-issued copy in class, I loved it. While The Sun Also Rises isn't the same level of novel as, say, Gatsby - which is riddled with symbols and rich aphorisms at every corner - Hemingway does good stuff. There are a lot of broad connections that can be made in TSAR, and while the plot is of a lower quality than that of many great stories, in the context of the almost oppressive aimlessness Hemingway intends to show, this wandering, unclear plot speaks volumes about the characters' approach to life.


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-Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
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wutherering
post May 2 2013, 03:48 AM
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QUOTE (Research Monkey @ May 1 2013, 08:06 PM) *
QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 05:07 PM) *
Nothing turns me off a book more than long passages about philosophy.


You make me sad...

I make myself sad...
Really, as I was writing that I was thinking "dang, i'm boring."
What really bores me when reading is when characters philosiphize when they don't put it firmly in a human societal context. Like, when people start talking about "right" and "rights" I get bored and turned off. In Infinite Jest I was interested in the passages where Marlathe and Steepley are standing on a mountain in Arizona or whatever because DFW inserted into those conversations things he had gleaned from his time trying to live like a human being, and things that helped him live with himself as a person, whether they were correct or good. So for example, I am not interested in whether God exists so much (not an interesting or really in many ways relevant question) but whether it is worth it for me to believe in it.
If anything, this is why one of my favorite authors is DFW, because he started out as the genius philosophy major at Amherst, and turned into someone who became interested in the practical ways of thinking about life because he was forced to. I guess.


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Research Monkey
post May 2 2013, 04:22 AM
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QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 08:48 PM) *
What really bores me when reading is when characters philosiphize when they don't put it firmly in a human societal context. Like, when people start talking about "right" and "rights" I get bored and turned off. In Infinite Jest I was interested in the passages where Marlathe and Steepley are standing on a mountain in Arizona or whatever because DFW inserted into those conversations things he had gleaned from his time trying to live like a human being, and things that helped him live with himself as a person, whether they were correct or good. So for example, I am not interested in whether God exists so much (not an interesting or really in many ways relevant question) but whether it is worth it for me to believe in it.


My favorite novel ever is interrupted every so often by a chapter reframing the plot in terms of Nietzsche's idea of eternal return, so to each his own I suppose...


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Crow
post May 2 2013, 08:02 AM
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QUOTE (wutherering @ May 1 2013, 07:27 PM) *
In regards to sci-fi, my experience in the genre is limited to the extensive Star Wars continuing series and Warhammer40k books. So my tastes generally tend to the bloody? I have read the Hitchiker's Guide, but I am looking for something a bit more serious than that to get into- a little bit harder and preferably a series?

I continually hear good thing's about John Scalzi's Old Man's War books, but I haven't tackled them myself yet.

Earlier, I pimped David Drake's work, which I quite enjoy. His Hammer's Slammers books are fairly prominent in military sci-fi. Galactic civilization is starting to spiral into anarchy, and a mercenary tank company will solve anybody's problem for the right price. Drake ended up getting drafted during the Vietnam war and very obviously did not enjoy himself over there.

Welcome aboard, by the way.


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Research Monkey
post May 2 2013, 11:35 AM
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QUOTE (Crow @ May 2 2013, 01:02 AM) *
Welcome aboard, by the way.


Echoing this.


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